Inverting Punting Questions

Typical analytic situation have three potentials for improvement (or, competition).

  1. Better data, think motion tracking in football or hockey.
  2. Better models, think the shift from batting average to on-base-percentage.
  3. Better people, think the 1980’s shift when Edward Thorpe began competing with other Ph.D.

However, the largest potential gain in analytics (at least sports, circa 2020) is the implementation. It’s no use coming up with a good idea if you can’t get it into the portfolio.

Richard Sherman and Chris Collinsworth offer a stopgap solution. Talking about the Pittsburgh Steelers decision to punt on fourth and one from the forty-six, “If you’re the Cleveland Browns you’re definitely relieved,” said Sherman, “shoot you only needed a yard, you can fall for a yard on most defenses.”

This idea has been around a long time in sports, Bill Simmons has spoken about it often on his podcast; what does my opponent fear the most? I’ll do that.

Some NFL teams have solved the implementation obstruction with a direct line from the analytics department to the coach. Teams slower to adopt and adapt can take the idea of inversion and just ask one of their coaches. It would be great to see a head coach ask his defensive coordinator if the offense should stay on the field, or indeed if they should punt.

Note, I listened to Thorpe’s A Man for All Markets and while long, it was good particularly because it was read by him!

What you pay: Deals in the NBA

Shane Jensen to Seth Partnow, “you make the decision to be agnostic to contract in your analysis, but as you think about building a team, contracts are something you need to take into account.” Partnow notes:

“If you’re doing an asset value ranking then age and contract come into the decision making process. There’s some players at the very high end you pay whatever: LeBron, Kawhi, Giannis. You pay them whatever because they still outperform that based on the max contract structure. It’s almost literally impossible to overpay those players.

Partnow

The other group that tends to outperform their contract is rookies, again based on contract structures.

This was in the same podcast where the Wharton hosts discussed Tom Brady, who is making more things go right, and appears to be defying the Howard Marks word of warning: “Buying good things can’t be the secret to success in investing. It has to be the price you pay. It’s not what you buy, it’s what you pay. There’s no asset so good it can’t become overpriced.”